What are your core beliefs?

IMG_0042A decade ago I moved from northern Virginia to a small town in Colorado with just a carful of belongings.   I left behind a marriage and a job and joined some good friends who were living what I saw as a conscious and sane life.  A part of me was looking for time in the mountains to deprogram and start afresh.  With more space and quiet, in a gentler town, perhaps I could get down to some wiser ways.

Did that happen?  In many ways it did.  The East is so dense with people, buildings, and culture that a girl sometimes can’t separate her own values out from those of the society.  In the cacophony, the quick pace, the getting and spending, one doesn’t even have time to think.  The attitudes of society soak in through her pores and affect her thoughts and behavior.

When I settled in Colorado, I found a job with odd hours, and I hiked up many a mountain.  I sought out yoga classes, then a yoga teacher training.  Slowly I began to unwind my physical patterns, my muscular tension and my defenses against the world.  In a hakomi, or body-centered psychotherapy, training I sat with peers in mindfulness and observed my core beliefs emerge.  I found an outstanding yoga teacher whose classes took me on an ecstatic journey, and after all this, I could feel my feet on the ground, my animal body engaged in the world, my heart open so that I engaged more easily with others.  I hoped work and love would flow more easily.  And they did, especially love.  Work?  I’m still progressing on that front.

Presently I find myself wondering how we in this country developed the mindset we have and the belief that we must work excessively and purchase new gadgets regularly.  I wonder how our environment, healthcare system, and political system all became so toxic or dysfunctional.  There is an armoring and network of habits at the national level just as there is at the individual level, of course.  We buffer ourselves against remembering another set of values by escaping into entertainment and the pursuit of status, or things.  I see a clinging to old beliefs and habits.  I see a belief in the dominance of a market economy above all.

I turned to history to understand more, and I read about the founding fathers and their ideas, about Christian fundamentalism, about the decline of intellectualism, about our perspectives on the body and about the evolution of psychology.  How, I wondered, did we become so materialistic?  How did a business mentality so thoroughly permeate medicine and education?  How did we get to this place where we must work such long hours and commute such long distances to have enough money for expenses?

At the same time I wonder what might help us to loosen hold of those beliefs and reconsider.  Let some new ideas in.  Would it be a change in education?  More yoga and less time on treadmills?  More time in nature?  That’s my prescription!  But each of us thinks we know what would be best, and none of us knows the whole truth about our troubles and what to do about them.

The good news is that younger people are coming up with new ways of doing things.  Whether it is because they are facing less abundance than their parents or just seeing what the world is now, they are already trying something different.  Generation Y, for example, is said to want a shorter work day and more time for family, more flexibility in their jobs, and meaningful work or lifestyle that includes work.  They want to support their communities.

I see this trend evolving in this small town I landed in.   Many young people are starting small businesses, collaborating to build a counter economy.  There are people making a living as web designers, social media managers, artists, and healers.  They find ways to network, or share office space, to promote one another’s businesses.  When our society can sustain these folks well, or if they can sustain themselves, we will all be healthier.

There is so much that is rich in life that becomes buried in business and striving.  I am a baby boomer with the values of Generation Y.  A yoga teacher in need of a job, a job in which I work with others for something I believe in and yet also have time for family and creative work.  Time to be outside.  Time for prayer and mediation and the study of history.  We need to really think about what we believe, what we feel in response to the world around us, and where we need to go.  Because if we don’t change course, we will pay a big price.

Can we not examine the bundles of assumptions and beliefs wrapped around us so tightly that we can’t notice?  It is time, right now, to slow down, to look both inside and out and consciously choose the values we will live.

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174 Comments

  1. truesimplicityblog

     /  January 18, 2013

    Lovely post, thank you! I’ve never heard of hakomi- interesting! Can I ask where you took the training? I’m a few months away from moving to Colorado and it seems like you had a good experience. Cheers! -Chrissy

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    • Hi Chrissy! Thanks so much for your note! I did the hakomi training in Boulder at the Hakomi Institute. It was very good, though it’s very intense emotionally. Best wishes with your move.
      Lynda

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      • truesimplicityblog

         /  January 21, 2013

        Thanks for the info! I’ll have to check it out. Wishing you and yours the best,
        Chrissy

  2. I think the capitalism/consumption/free market systems we embraced in the past were necessary once to get us through the industrial revolution and beyond. They got us this far. What is now evident is that they won’t work for the future. Sticking with these paradigms will have catastrophic consequences. If we want different results then we’ll have to change.

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  3. Very thoughtful and sensitive post. Thank you.

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  4. Great post!!! :D
    I also believe that one should take sometime for meditation and discovering the inner self without thinking about the stress and tensions of this materialistic world.. you are right Slow Down.. look around.. look at the smiling baby, at the small flower, at the experienced wrinkled faced of an old lady.. at the smallest feelings.. believe me, it will take you to a whole another level of satisfaction and happiness.

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  5. Emily paul

     /  January 21, 2013

    Perfectly written.. I even wonder how did we get into the practice of working hard for the new gadgets…And love the phrase “Time for prayer and mediation and the study of history” as what I feel I should do it.

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  6. wonderful sharing .

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  7. Wise words. I, too, hope the penduluum swings back to a saner pace and an emphasis on family/friends/life. I applaud you for having the courage to make the leap. Colorado has always called to me. There’s something about looking at those mountains–makes all our human problems seem minute.

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  8. Nice post! I am generation Y but i am also scared of what is going to happen to the younger generation who seem to be lazier and lazier..Want it all now without any efforts..Consuming everything without being careful of the consequences..Its all very scary. I was a childhood educator for almost 10yrs and parents are now treating their children as Kings, they all get what they want because the parents feels guilty for working so much..Now what kind of adults is that going to make??

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  9. I have also never heard of Hakomi before. Thanks for teaching me something new! :-)

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  10. This post is perfect. I admire your courage for going off-the-grid, so to speak, and take time to connect with yourself.

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  11. Great post. Living in PEI (small island on the east coast of Canada) I get the mindset you are talking about people supporting one another in small business and the whole counter economy thing. It is all word of mouth in the small business world that resides here and it is a beautiful thing. I work as an auto detailer and there is a shop that does almost the same thing and sends us business all the time. We all like to support each other and support our own economy, sometimes it is only to look at things on a smaller scale.

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  12. I’m a little weary of our materialistic culture as well, which is why I write and meditate to make myself more relaxed and centered. When we step away from all the noise, the silence is so nice, so peaceful, I just can’t help but love it.

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  13. Reblogged this on bebebababubu.

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  14. Thank you for sharing this story with us, it´s kind of inspiring!

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  15. What a great read, gives one something to really think about.

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  16. The short answer to how we developed the idea that we need to work unreasonably hard and buy gadgets we don’t need is the Calvinist roots of this country–those good ol’ Pilgrims and the values they brought with them to this country as well as other similar groups. Simply, they believed that God likes hard work and the devil likes laziness. They also believed that people rewards hard workers with wealth, so wealth is a sign of favor from God and poverty is an indication of its absence. They displayed their wealth within the constraints of believing you should not get caught up with frivolity–that part we seemed to have lost. But their ideas about wealth and hard work remained and spread and became an important part of what it means to be an American. We still believe them. It seems unlikely to change within our lifetimes, although perhaps it may be possible to make a dent in our national culture.

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  17. Fantastic article–I agree with you whole-heartedly! I have been teaching yoga for 12 years, and I have these thoughts constantly. How did it get to this? How do we fix it? Thank you for sharing your insights. Beautifully written. BTW, I grew in in Northern VA, and fled after college to find a simpler life in Atlanta. Still here, 18 years later, and have managed to keep life simple despite the growth of the city (I teach yoga from my home). Best of luck with your pursuits in CO.

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  18. Searching for the Light

     /  January 21, 2013

    The problem with modern society stems from the fact that we judge others not for who they are or what they contribute but by their visible wealth hence the need for gadgets. In a consumer driven world where instant gratification is a must there is a desire to always have the latest or the best. I strive to teach my children differently but struggle with this as they always want what others have. Teaching them to look for the good in others (and themselves) rather than at the their material possessions is a constant battle.

    You are right that as a society we have lost our core values and beliefs and traded them in for possessions and supposed wealth. Some of the happiest people I know have very little materially but are secure in who they are and the contribution they make to society, they have beliefs and values and are not afraid to show them.

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  19. They say that Italians work to live and Americans live to work – it’s very true, but it’s so difficult – and scary – to escape the safety and predictability of the daily grind. Your comments on yoga remind me of how I felt when I took up yoga to help myself get out of a “funk” some years ago. Yoga reminded me that I have a physical body, and it’s healthy and active and strong. It kind of helped my mind to reconnect with the physical aspect of my being again, and it was empowering and stabilizing at a time when I felt like the proverbial rug had been pulled from under my feet. Great post! Lots of food for thought.

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  20. I am pursuing what you write here and at the moment I am succeeding in it: I work in the nature 5 months a year and I am starting a freelance career, I canalize energy with the practice of Qi Gong and I have the time to really live. But lately I have been asking my self about the others and I would love to hear your opinion on it: people who live in perfect accordance to the bad side of western life style (i.e. consumption with no limits, ignorance, egoism) are conscious and happy with that? Are they aware but unable to change? Or they just go on automatically and have stopped thinking?

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  21. **Enjoyed reading your thoughts..What I’d like to add to that is I think we’ve also entered a time of spiritual enlightment. A need to get a closer relationship to our father, our CREATOR. In my opinion and in my experience when this realization hits a person; a person’s natural tendency is to live life simpler and to put more value on personal relationships than material objects. Happened to me after a recent move cross-country(and also a combination of a life journey progression towards getting to right “here and now”)…(after having been on the West Coast for 20 yrs) Thankfully , I’m in the company of quite a large group of people who also feel/live in the same manner. Giving back to others! Instead of just worrying about how much material objects can be attained…What are my core beliefs? To love, love!, love..and to share that love , from the inside out, with others. Stay UPlifted N blessed

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    • Thanks so much for your thoughtful reply! It’s inspiring to hear your thoughts and feelings on the matter and a bit about your own lifestyle and beliefs. Lynda

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  22. Great post about following your heart.

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  23. And why, oh, why, does everyone “have” to go to college? We are losing many skilled trades the loss of many will rue when they need help with the plumbing or electric wiring, etc. Tradesmen/women keep this country going so the rest of us can work at white collar/non-trade jobs/careers. Very good post. Thank you.

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  24. This is so true, especially slowing down and taking time to get to know ourselves and what’s really important to us. Often it takes a crisis before we will step off the treadmill and really look properly at our lives. From the rubble, we can chose to build differently. There’s also something about working just so we can buy new things, which makes me think of wage slaves….working for the good of capitalism….which usually means we are helping people who already have more than enough, make even more….from us :-) We don’t have to if we don’t want to….we can chose to live a simpler more authentic life. Thanks for the thought provoking post.

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  25. There is an over-emphasis on being “productive” — of income/profit/material goods. Then it’s reified by fetishizing the wealthy and focusing on their lives and spending habits as if our only/best choice is to emulate them. It takes guts and focus to avoid or ignore this widespread peer and media pressure. It can be done, but you have to be very intentional. I live in an area north of NYC where people are face-palmingly horrified if you don’t earn in the high six figures, live in a huge home, etc. Meh. I just laugh at it. Once you are as clear as you are about your values and priorities, it gets easier.

    Great post,

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  26. i love this, thank you so much. i am passing it along to those i love

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  27. I agree and disagree with you. In the ways I disagree with you, I still agree (if that makes sense). I find myself being pulled back into that old realm of work and yet so much of me feels that it is good to be a part of community. The part of me that left that world behind, still yearns to leave it behind. Basically, I find myself split in that I want a balance that I’m not sure exists.

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  28. lifeoftransition

     /  January 22, 2013

    I do miss the wide open county. Being able to roam for miles. Fresh crisp air.

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  29. Enjoyed reading this post. Sometimes i think that something very drastic has to happen for our society to appreciate the simple basics. Here in the east is cold right now, desperately awaiting spring so I can get out and do some fishing at the river. The smell, sound, and life of nature I crave.

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  30. Thank you for your essay. I’m in my early 50′s and looking to downsize my life. Your post gave me a good roadmap for doing just that.

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  31. Oh, you have described me! Not the you, who seems to be in touch with the real world and her own core beliefs … but the one caught in working long hours, sucking in the long commute, surviving but not living … a seeker searching for peace, health, center. Do you think I’ll find it at 62?

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    • I guess we find it a little bit here and there, right? We gradually evolve, but its messy as we do. I have my form of the dynamics you speak of! Lynda

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  32. My core beliefs are these: love is the most important thing in the world. It’s free to give to others. Smile (with purpose) at strangers. Give your heart away! Every day. It’s very much like rubber- it’s made to be resilient and bounce back. Store your possessions in heaven- not earth- they’ll do little good here anyway- they won’t last forever. Love, on the other hand, is a different story. We can take that with us after we’re finished with our journey here. Love is so powerful- it transcends this world, and others. Above all else- give to others of yourself. Bleed, Cry, Share your laughter and tears- DO for others. Material possessions mean little to me; these are the things that I live by…

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  33. Very thought provoking! Thank you for sharing your experiences! I think I will be considering my values more skeptically in the coming days.

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  34. What a wonderful post!! Thanks so much for sharing it!

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  35. What interests me is how there seems to be such consensus that the consumerist culture isnt ideal yet few manage to sustain a break from it. To understand that it seems to me we also have to explore the roots of our addictions and anomie. Thanks for the post, you seem to be doing well, and I have to admit a little envy in reading it.

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    • Yes, it’s a good point that we have to explore those roots. Seems like some are doing well at that, like Gabor Mate, who I want to get around to reading. Thanks for writing! Lynda

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  36. keep up the good work…really inspiring .

    http://www.ottomandandy.com

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  37. Excellent post!

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  38. what a nice post!

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  39. I read your blog with great interest. It takes great courage to start afresh as you did. Well done. I have found that since I have been working with reiki and carrying out daily meditations, that I have been more in tune with my core beliefs and values as well as being less judgemental. I take time out for myself on a daily basis . I dont want to retire someday and think wow – who am i really ? I want to discover this beforehand so that I can do what I want to do before I am either to sick or too old to do so.

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    • Wow, I share your sentiments! Thanks Marion, for the note and for sharing some of your thoughts. Sounds like our paths are similar, and meditation, doing reiki or hakomi or yoga really take us into exploring our unconscious beliefs and to shed some of them, don’t they? Lynda

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  40. Great post, I love the occasional philosophical type conversations. World issues come up often where I work and I often fond myself in a bind since it can easily turn to a debate. My end response is always the same, ‘be kind’, it is what I feel is the best answer to nearly everything and it is what I tech my kids. My family has been scrapping by for a while now but we still endure and things improve because we remain patient and give to others who are even less fortunate than us. Many of my generation have also found great value in trading services and goods for other services and goods. There are still so many people who have a special skill or training and want cash payment. In reality not many people have extra cash to spare. We get our eggs and some other foods because we offer those who have them things like childcare and baked goods. It makes our life easier, less costly and we support our community.

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    • It’s nice to hear about your lifestyle and to know there are others out there doing it differently: Thanks for writing! Lynda

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  41. great post! i especially loved the observation of gen y and its adaptations to todays world…

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  42. Being June

     /  January 22, 2013

    Well said. I completely agree that we (society) are on a bad path. A change needs to come, and you’ve added quite meaningfully to the conversation. Now, if only more people would participate! Congratulations on being deservedly Freshly Pressed.

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  43. I whole-heartedly agree! I recently quit my day job to pursue freelancing. It has been scary at first, but I must say I’m enjoying the flexible schedule. And I’m certainly loving the extra time with loved ones (and on days like yesterday, time to get over a cold!). Thanks for posting :)

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  44. Gardengirl

     /  January 22, 2013

    Excellent post! Even in my small town it is hard to crawl out from under the pile of ‘I have more so I am better’. We have chosen to live WELL within our means. That doesn’t just mean being able to afford our home and vehicles, it also means that we live well. We do activities with our children and take them to church and have family meals…WITHOUT CELL PHONES! We enjoy each other and are happy…and yet we live in the smallest house on the street. Great job expressing a major problem in our culture and a growing trend to reverse it and go back to ‘the good old days’. Although, we are actually moving ahead, not back. Hopefully, more people will wake up and see the light before it’s too late.

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  45. I could comment on each aspect of your blog in full, and that would be good for me to get out, however I will keep it simple.

    I love what you are doing and thank you for the read.

    Peace

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    • Thanks Teddy! I’d love to hear your thoughts. Lynda

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      • Thanks Lynda! Well, I think I am gonna have to save my energy on this one. Your thoughts are terrific and I love what you are doing. It seems that we all have a drive and a journey, IF we choose to accept and follow Truth and our Hearts calling.

  46. Truly a beautiful post! Thank you for sharing and intoducing me to Hakomi! I too am often lost between this consumerism society, where I am constantly trying to reach expectations and my own inner peace and pursuit for happiness.

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  47. Great post! I am following you now. My name is Carlos, if you ever want to know about Ocean Paddling, follow us back! Cheers

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  48. I liked these questions you asked..

    How, I wondered, did we become so materialistic? How did a business mentality so thoroughly permeate medicine and education? How did we get to this place where we must work such long hours and commute such long distances to have enough money for expenses?

    i wish u would go further with them :)

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    • Thanks for the note! I hope to explore those questions more in coming blogs–been reading Anti-intellectualism in American Life to help me think about them. Best wishes, Lynda

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  49. I can completely relate! I left Chicago for middle-western Oklahoma and so many people asked me ‘what in the world is in OK?’…at first I really didn’t have a response other than -’it’s something different’. But now after 9 months here I can say that ‘sanity and self’ have been rediscovered! Great post!

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  50. Thanks for the inspiration and motivation to keep on trucking! Lovely post.

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  51. What wonderful words! I work in academia (but moonlight as a cook/nutritionist/yogi), and it kills me constantly how obsessed people are with productivity and how they treat time as a commodity. I think a lot of it comes from the fact that in our past, because material possessions or surplus food were a thing, we have basically hoarding genes deep within us that cause us to grab onto things when we can. However, since our genetics are now at a bit of a discord with our current environment, all of these nasty habits have popped up (not to mention diseases of affluence). I sympathize with you and I am trying to make a difference on this front through food. Meaning, teaching people how to take the time to nourish them selves and to slow down over a meal and catch up with loved ones, even in our “busy” lives!

    Best of luck!

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    • Thanks Alexandra, I really appreciate your thought on time as a commodity. It’s helpful to remember that end of the issue: I agree with you on it and am inspired to “meet” you and hear a little about your work. Best of luck to you too, Lynda

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  52. Intriguing post! It triggers /my/ mind to to think about the world deeply. Also, I just learned what hakomi is thanks to this~

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  53. an absolutely beautiful post! so inspirational <3

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  54. Reblogged this on miss mediate and commented:
    This sounds remarkably like my recent experience. Moving from Boston to Olympia, WA.

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  55. I love it when someone gets me thinking, when I’m forced to think about things I am quite happy to shove aside. Thank you for getting me thinking. Lovely read.

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  56. Very Motivational Post. Finding inner self is a lng long journey, even longer if you belong from somewhere , where your own values and norms are not counted at all. Not by anyone else other then you !

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  57. Great post, everyone would benefit from stopping and examining their lives once in a while. I have spent a lifetime trying to live with the paradoxes being human throws up. And just re read ‘The AGe of Absurdity’ by Micheal Foley which examines history and sociology along with philosophy in a very engaging accessible way, which makes you want to laugh and cry at the same time. Worth trying to borrow or buy a copy. Well worth!

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  58. I agree with you wholeheartedly. I also think that the expectations of others is something that has a huge influence on how we live. Even when they are not physically there, we “hear” their opinion of our choices or imagine how they would react disapprovingly so a lot of our choices tend to be dictated by what we deem acceptable to our absentee panel of judges. Thanks for the inspiration!

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    • Thanks Rebecca! Good point about the voices in our heads–they are often the loudest, and I often don’t realize they are influencing me so much. Lynda

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  59. very inspiring to anyone who is in the process of re-examining their life and looking for new meaning and purpose. thank you!

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  60. Some fantastic thought provoking messages there – “The East is so dense with people, buildings, and culture that a girl sometimes can’t separate her own values out from those of the society.” Amazing how often people use “society” as a requirement to “fit in” or to “not stand out”. It becomes our driving force and we allow this thing that we call society to dictate our future e.g. society says that if i want a good job (not even sure what a good job means any more), that i must have a specific education from a great school (so who decides which ones are great and using what form of measurement?). I love that you are questioning this and working on your own values. Keep up the great work.

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  61. Hi, I too left Northern Virginia after 16 years. I returned to central Virginia, where I spent 11 years as a child. Although still in Virginia, I chose a sustainable lifestyle and began blogging about it in 2011. Can’t say this life is the perfect one, yet most of the madness was aborted when I returned to the foothills. Best to you in 2013! Drop by my blog when you have time. Comments always appreciated.

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    • Hi Diane-I’ll check out your blog! Thanks for the note: I love Virginia and miss it, and I’m interested in what you have been writing too. Thanks, Lynda

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      • Hi Lynda- please check out my draw down menus, as WordPress limits the number of titles that show. Not much to blog about when the outdoor temps are 10F!

  62. hello – out of curiosity: what are your core beliefs?

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    • Hello! Well, much of what I’m talking in this particular blog are the erroneous beliefs about the world or self, like I’m unworthy, or I don’t fit anywhere, or we have to do jobs we don’t like. Things we pick up when we are young that become a part of our unconscious assumptions about the world. Do you know what I mean?

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      • t
        hanks for getting back to me Lynda – I just feel that much of what we ‘believe’ is actually just reaction and ‘beliefs’ in development – a sort of learning. But confronted with a question like: ‘What sre your core beliefs?’ – we have to take a serious audit to see what we feel we can finally be quite certain about. I have a feeling mine will be a short list – but am going to have a try in a blog. What’s on your list? (this is now research!) Liam

      • Thanks for that Lynda,

        I was playing Devils Advocate a bit here. Have you ever noticed people define themselves by what they don’t believe or disagree with? I am going to write something about my core beliefs – so thought I’d ask you this as a bit of research… I suspect there will not be as much to write about as I’d hope! L

      • I see . . . I’ll look for your blog on the subject! Thanks.

  63. You have a great perspective. I’m glad you found your happiness through your core beliefs that what made your life fulfilling so many years now. Thanks for this great post.

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  64. I appreciate your sentiments. I’m between jobs and find myself looking at what is next with skepticism and trepidation. I live in Los Angeles, and the pressures are enormous. I’m just starting my own blog on this path of self discovery. It’s a scary time to be unemployed. I’m studying for my Social Media certificate and finding out about how this whole cyberspace of connecting works. It’s fascinating. I grew up in Louisiana, but spent time outside of major metropolitan areas, as well as in Missoula, Montana – so I’m not sure where the next adventure will take me…. maybe like you I’ll eventually decide to streamline and let go of my roots here as a homeowner and live a simpler less demanding life. I hope you’ll check out http://www.louisianadreamer.wordpress.com and share your feedback.

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    • Thanks for writing Linda! I will check out your blog. We have some parallels–I am studying digital media and exploring cyberspace too. Lynda

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  65. Very well said. Glad I found this post.

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  66. “Time to be outside.  Time for prayer and mediation and the study of history.  We need to really think about what we believe, what we feel in response to the world around us, and where we need to go.”

    Been living in Thailand for the last four months and can honestly say that the traveling and soul-searching has helped me begin to see the world the way it really is, the way you describe. Thanks for the amazing post.

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  67. Great post, the world moves in cycles as do we, in time to come everybody will come to appreciate, what can be held in your hand, can be taken away, but what is held in your heart will stay with you forever.

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  68. Maria

     /  January 24, 2013

    “The East is so dense with people, buildings, and culture that a girl sometimes can’t separate her own values out from those of the society.” How sadly true that is. I am an east-coaster and I just loved every word of this post! Thank you. Maybe some day I’ll be out there in the mountains doing yoga with you! Yoga is one of the few things that keeps me sane where I am right now.

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  69. “What are your core beliefs?”

    drink beer whenever you can.
    read lots of books.
    Thanks.

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  70. I am a yogini and that has drastically changed the way I navigate the landscape of life. I struggle to balance my yogic lifestyle amongst life, motherhood, and career. Thank you for your insight. Namaste. Kristi from http://www.hallelujahhighway.com

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  71. I enjoyed your post, especially:
    “More yoga and less time on treadmills?”

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  72. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I enjoyed the read and the subsequent thoughts it provoked.

    I’m trying right now to answer this question. I’ve been trying, for years.  My entire belief system was swept out from under me when I realized I no longer believed in the Christian religion. “If everything else is built upon that, and that is gone,” I asked myself, “what remains?” I’ve come up with a few things so far. One of them is, “I Believe In Interconnectedness.

    I’m looking forward to reading more (I subscribed). Take care.

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    • Thanks for the note Jason. I relate to the breakdown of the Christian belief system. I suspect at its core, Christianity encompasses deeper beliefs such as interconnectedness, but we don’t hear much about that part of it, so we have to go somewhere else. It’s a fascinating exploration, isn’t it? I really appreciate hearing from you and the fact that you’ll perhaps read more. It keeps me writing. Warmly, Lynda

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  73. Your mindset shows that you are willing to think and live “out of the box”, which is what is needed in these times of economic and lifestyle transition. I hope you write more about the authentic pursuit of a worthy, rewarding, and sustainable lifestyle in these austere times. Good luck!

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  74. Amen. Well said.

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  75. I recently joined the salsa classes my Spanish teacher offers, which made me realize how nice it is to use my body. That made me content on living out my childhood dream of doing martial arts, and I started practicing Aikido. This then awakened some part of my mind I did not know of, and to further explore this I started practicing Yoga. Through all this I feel I am slowly becoming more aware of myself, thus also of others, and what in life is more important than us, our minds, bodies, and our relationships? I really enjoyed your post, it was great to hear similar beliefs coming from another person, on the other side of the world! Very touching.
    Nikolaj.

    Reply
    • Thank you so much for the note. What an education you’ve experienced, in the true sense of the word, through the body. We do seem to have had similar experiences and beliefs, and it is so lovely to hear your thoughts on how the mind and heart wake up with the body! Lynda

      Reply
  76. Great post! I loved the mention of Gen Y and how their work preferences have shifted to include more family and free time. It’s so true!

    Reply
  77. This really resonates with me and the phase I am at now in life. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  78. Thank you for this inspiring post. I am in the situation right now that I want to get a hold again of the life I used to have and standing strong to my beliefs. Very uplifting.

    Reply
  79. ohtallulah

     /  January 26, 2013

    Very inspiring blog! Right now my core belief is love and I’m on a mission to find it through simplicity. Simplify my mind, body, home, relationships and overall my life. I’m trying to spend more time in nature to connect with what is around my instead of what’s infront of me (computers for example ;) )
    Thanks again :)

    http://choosesimplicitydotorg.wordpress.com/

    Reply
  80. It’s sad how most of us operate. Our belief system went out the door along with our sanity, hard earned money, and time.

    Reply
  81. What a wonderful post!! Thanks so much for sharing it!

    Reply
  82. You are right. We should not live by default and live our lives according to what society dictate us. I used to had a hectic social and professional life believing that it’s the way to make oneself useful. Now I choose my projects and devote my time on things I personally enjoy and one of them is creating http://www.womenchampiononline.com leisurely.

    Reply
  83. Great post! I spend a large amount of time educating others on the ideas of sustainable business models, community currencies and such – - to read that you are witnessing these activities in the younger generation gives me hope – I first learned about these things around 2000 and until market crashes and lost 401(k)s not too many people in my circle were even interested in hearing about them! :>) I’m glad to see these ideas have gone from ‘seed sowing’ stage to “early blooming’ status!

    Reply
  84. Reblogged this on Oyia Brown.

    Reply
  85. Lovely, thought provoking post. I just have one comment. The flaw, that keeps us caged, is to think government is the answer. Government permeates every move we make and as the government dictates, so we follow. The freedom you search for in the small community of like minded people is the freedom I found as a youth working in a small farming community. People helped one another without expecting anything in return. Though fiercely independant they gave freely. This was a time (50′s) when there was little government interference in our lives. After the so-called safety nets for society were built, the walls went up and people began to focus more on themselves, thus the focus on consumption. For a many years I have longed for the simple times I grew up with in rural farming communities in the 50′s. But small farms have gone the way of small business, because government is on the side of Big AG and Big Business. I used to think it was something I could flee by moving back to the country, but governments reach is too long and too pervasive. As another way of illustrating my point I will leave you with a quote from the preface of my book “Truth’s Blood”, which by the way, pokes fun at many of these issues.

    “Again and again after freedom has brought opportunity and some degree of plenty, the competent become selfish, luxury-loving and complacent, the incompetent and the unfortunate grow envious and covetous, and all three groups turn aside from the hard road of freedom to worship the Golden Calf of economic security. The historical cycle seems to be: From bondage to spiritual faith; from spiritual faith to courage; from courage to liberty; from liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to apathy; from apathy to dependency; and from dependency back to bondage once more.

    At the stage between apathy and dependency, men always turn in fear to economic and political panaceas. New conditions, it is claimed, require new remedies. Under such circumstances, the competent citizen is certainly not a fool if he insists upon using the compass of history when forced to sail uncharted seas. Usually so-called new remedies are not new at all. Compulsory planned economy, for example, was tried by the Chinese some three millenniums ago, and by the Romans in the early centuries of the Christian era. It was applied in Germany, Italy and Russia long before the present war broke out. Yet it is being seriously advocated today as a solution of our economic problems in the United States. Its proponents confidently assert that government can successfully plan and control all major business activity in the nation, and still not interfere with our political freedom and our hard-won civil and religious liberties. The lessons of history all point in exactly the reverse direction.”

    Henning W. Prentis, “Industrial Management in a Republic,” 1943

    Reply
    • Your comment is more thought provoking than my post! Thanks for the historical and government-related perspective. I’ll check out your blog. Lynda

      Reply
      • Lynda, you will find my blog has a lot to do with organic gardening and beekeeping. The book is there also and though its fiction it takes some shots at the hypocracies in our society. It’s only $2.99 on Amazon if you want to check it out.

        Beekeeping is my main focus on the blog right now. Be sure to check that out as I think you will find it interesting.

      • I have checked it out and will do so more. Thanks Tyler!

  86. Great discussion and an interesting paradox to think about. It’s that dysfunctional pursuit of gadgets and material objects that gave us the very platform we are all talking on. I’m hopeful that future generations will learn to wed the pursuit of significance and purpose with progress and technology.

    Reply
    • Great point on this paradox: It seems there are young people wedding those pursuits. I hope the technology helps them find each other and have an influence! Lynda

      Reply
  87. good article. lets someone pause and think. :)

    Reply
  88. This is such an inspiriting, beautiful and sincere post! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this! Thank you!

    Reply
  89. The Savvy Senorita

     /  January 28, 2013

    Hey great post, thank you for sharing!!!! Completely appreciate and believe the sentiments expressed here!!
    Time to find ourselves, our true selves and not just allowing the babble from ‘humanity’ influence or direct or curtail us. It is so important to reconnect with ourselves, it is being in tune with our core that can make the difference between a life and a true inspirational journey. Please take a look at a post I wrote, with a similar thread attached; One Moment In Time
    Thanks once again,
    Bex :)

    Reply
    • Thanks Bex! I read your post and thank you too. A good reminded to me this day. Lynda

      Reply
      • The Savvy Senorita

         /  February 1, 2013

        Thanks for your response Lynda, and thanks for reading my post :)
        Appreciate that!! Yes, it is good to be reminded to just enjoy where we are and what we are doing – instead of wanting to move on to the next moment all the time!!!!!!!

  90. love2sellhomes

     /  January 28, 2013

    Great Post! Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  91. I definitely have a different outlook on life than you do, but I respect what you are saying. I also commend you for being so courageous and taking the steps that you did to follow your core beliefs. I loved your closing statement: “It is time, right now, to slow down, to look both inside and out and consciously choose the values we will live.” We all have different values, but no matter the differences, it is important for us to spend time figuring out what they are and making a conscious choice to live by them.

    Reply
    • It’s nice to hear from someone with a different outlook: Thank you for the specific comments and kind words. I really appreciate it! Lynda

      Reply
  92. Oh, that we could impress the wisdom of Solitude upon all that may spend their lives running. The quiet grace of the moment, the time to reflect; Those are the lessons worth fighting for. Are they not accessible for all? Is their value shrouded behind some veil? How does the Wolf convince the Man that his trinkets mean nothing?

    Reply
  93. Good post, great question. Congrats on FP. What worries me is the increasing disconnect with our “core beliefs”. Social media is a double edged sword. It has created a society that “trends” rather than thinks. We think we’re jumping on the right band wagon because media tells us so.
    My core tells me that religion has no business anyplace other than at home. It compels me to question, learn, and explore. I’m grateful for every day of my life, and sleep well at night because I speak my mind. I work to live and experience, rather than live to work.

    Reply
    • Isn’t it true we let the media define our reality? Thanks very much for the comment, Lynda

      Reply
      • Sadly, you are bang on. Worse yet, once cocooned in that reality we only follow the media that suits our perspective. I’ve heard Americans refer to CNN as the “Communist News Network” , they hang on every word spoken by Ann Coulter or Bill O’Reilly. Scary stuff.

      • Yes, those two are scary!

    • “If you want the truth to stand clear before you, never be for or against. The struggle between “for” and “against” is the mind’s worst disease.”

      Buddhist Zen Master Sent-ts’an

      “Whoso would be a man must be a nonconformist.”

      Ralph Waldo Emerson

      Reply
  94. congratulations on featured in Freshly pressed.

    Reply
  95. mkesling63

     /  February 4, 2013

    This is an excellent post. I believe all left to a self pulled education and all the good things in life just start making sense without the whole easy study gig. Time. What a person can do and provide more with. Time your own your way. Criminal use of all is going to stop by putting the root cause where it belongs and it will be kept there. Government like every other business in the world is going to conduct itself within it’s limits too. There is going too be only one difference in government then any other business. It has enforceable power and it will remain without prejudice and a direct democracy too. This will be worldwide.

    Reply
  96. I do believe that the spirit seeks more than the culture is providing. Probably more than it can possibly provide. I have some thoughts on this on my latest post at http://traditium.com/2013/01/29/unraveling-saint-buddha/ if you’re interested.

    Reply
    • Thank you for the note and for sharing your blog. You are covering an important and often forgotten area, and I hope many are reading: I’ll follow your writings. Lynda

      Reply
  97. Wonderful post. I enjoyed reading it. Keep writing!

    Reply
  98. I love this! I wish I could do this with my life!

    Reply
  99. Lots of truth in your blog which was eloquently written, It’s always good to read and question things. I think this helps define our own personal core beliefs.

    Reply
  100. Reblogged this on SwissChiropractic's Blog and commented:
    Wise thoughts!

    Reply
  101. My core beliefs have evolved …. for me my moment of questioning came after my father’s death….why are we here? what is the point of life?
    In search of answers to these questions I have developed a set of core beliefs that really resonate with me. I am still in the process of going through my beliefs to keep the ones that are working for me and letting go of what is not working for me.
    I used to worry about the future and youth and world…..etc Now I believe the universal laws are such that they keep world ever evolving to be better and better.
    I think you have done a wonderful job in writing this blog and making people think about thier core beliefs.
    I look forward to reading more of your blogs.

    Reply
    • Thank you very much for the comment. I, too, began to question more after my father died. I appreciate hearing about your belief in universal laws and the ability to trust in them!

      Reply
  102. I cannot speak for everyone, but for myself. I only realized who I was, when I found Jesus Christ. For I was lost, but now found. I don’t have a religion, I have a relationship with the King of Kings, and Lord of Lords, when I just realized what He did for me on that cross. This is my true meaning of life, and my core belief. Thanks for your post. I am also a Christian writer, if you feel led to check out my blog. Blessings…..

    Reply
  103. Yes, it’s great to connect with folks through blogs, have conversations, learn what others are thinking! Thanks very much for the note. Lynda

    Reply
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